Lila Ike on Gotti Gotti

Fresh out the studio, Lila Ike’s second single, “Gotti Gotti” is available on all platforms; stream it on Soundcloud, YouTube or Spotify, buy it on iTunes or Amazon, what are you waiting on? Lila is basically telling off the greedy people roaming the earth. In Jamaica there’s a saying “Wanty wanty nuh get it and getty getty nuh want it” which translates to “those who want it aren’t getting it and those who got it don’t want it.” In this song, miss Lila is playing on the saying; instead she says “you got it but you ever (still) want want…” Leaving little for those who have none at all. Straight out of Jamaica under the In Digg Nation Collective, take a listen to Gotti Gotti by Lila Ike.

Follow @_LilaIke on Twitter and @LilaIke on Instagram. The track artwork is by @PaigeZombie on Instagram.

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

Today I have a new reggae song on the scene, “Punchinella” by Pentateuch Movement. I appreciate the authentic ‘rootsy’ sound of the riddim. In the song he’s telling Punchinella what he has to offer, some reasons she should accept his love. Though, Punchinella has her sights set on someone else. Take a listen to Punchinella, tell me what you think in the comments below!

Follow @PentateuchMove on Twitter and @PentateuchMovement on Instagram.

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Lily Of Da Valley

Serengetti, Hope Zoo

We had gathered for the launch of “Lily Of Da Valley” Jesse Royal’s debut album. The event was amazing; it was beautiful to see all the fans come out, despite the rainy weather we had a packed venue. The Serengetti space in Hope Zoo is home to the the Rib Kage restaurant. It was my first time at the newly formed restaurant. The venue was arranged to fit a large stage, as well as space for standing and a few seating options. The green surroundings gave a feeling of being in a forest, a people filled forest though. The venue was filled was warm energy as people milled about, waiting for the start of the show.

Jesse Royal, Lily of da valley, debut album, reggae, in Jamaica, Debbie Bisson, 87Lover, Universal Reggae, Serengetti,
Jesse Royal answers a question from host, Debbie Bissoon (Photo: Universal Reggae)

The night began with a short question and answer segment; where Debbie Bissoon asked Jesse Royal questions. To name a few, she asked what was his inspiration for the name of the album, what he stood for as a Rastafarian, and for a couple words to young artistes on how to get motivation to pursue this life. He said he got inspiration from his Grandma, when he was younger she would take him to church with her, and he enjoyed hearing the choir singing, “Lily of the Valley.”  As a Rastafarian Jesse Royal is fighting for love, family and strength. To give a few wise words to upcoming artistes, his advice is to “follow what’s inside you…” He went on to say there’s a voice inside of each and everyone, and once you reason with yourself and get to understand the being that is you.; you will figure out how to persist on your journey. Only you can figure it out.

Three of Jesse’s favourites off the album are 400 Years, Always Be Around, and Jah Will See Us Through. He explained that 400 Years is a reminder that the struggle nuh done,  Always Be Around is from the birth of his first child, it’s telling his daughter, he will always be around. And Jah Will See Us Through is a special song to him, it gave hopefulness in certain situations during this year, this song iterated that, “There’s a God that run bout yah and no weapon formed against you shall prosper.” To close the Q&A segment they played songs off the album for us.

Jesse Royal, Lily of da valley, debut album, reggae, in Jamaica, 87Lover, Universal Reggae, Serengetti,
Jesse Royal (Photo: Universal Reggae)

After a short break Jesse took the stage with his full band, firstly giving us 400 Years. He almost went through the entire album. Anyone that’s a fan can attest to his soulfulness while performing. He gained the attention of everyone in the crowd as he sang, we could feel the energy and intent of his songs as he performed. He sang Life Sweet, Stand Firm, Roll Me Something Good, Real Love, Rock It Tonight, Generation, Jah Will See Us Through, Modern Day Judas, and Always Be Around. He ended the lovely night with a meet and greet with the fans.

“Lily Of Da Valley” by Jesse Royal is now available worldwide, purchase the album at JesseRoyalMusic.

Follow @JesseRoyal1 on all social media platforms.

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

*Drum rolls* Today we have something new from Royal Blu. It wasn’t in the early morning that he released this song but it had your girl wishing that it was. Royal Blu gave us “Early Morning” a while back, it has been on my list. Somehow it came up the perfect time, we’re near the end of the hurricane season but it has been raining almost every single day since the beginning of October; this song makes me feel like it’s raining, it is just soothing. In this track he croons to his lover, telling her how much he needs her, reveling in their love. Big up Dj Densen differently, he produced the track, I love the rhythm. Take a listen to Early Morning by Royal Blu.

Follow @theRoyalBlu on all social media platforms!

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Protoje and Mortimer Stand Up for Truths & Rights

I’m here to represent for the group of people who sit and wait for Protoje to bless the universe with new music; he never disappoints. Last week Proto dropped “Truths and Rights” featuring Mortimer and it took my Twitter timeline by storm, with good reason. The song was produced by Winta James, and I’m not being biased when I say him have the formula… the rhythms from him are good and unique.

Truths and Rights speaks up for the youths in society… the future of the country. As well as the evident inequality that befalls the masses. They encourage us to think keenly about the choices we make in life, and inject that a little love can go a long way.

“When all the youths need is a chance, not a bly

I thought strongly about typing out the entire second verse, for you to see why I am so moved by this song. There’s so much wrong in society, and people need to hear and see it, people need to be the change. And it can simply start by caring about each other, we’re all human beings. Take a listen to Truths and Rights.

“Until the day that my soul takes flight, Babylon will hear my voice,

cause we deh yah so fi truths and rights.”

I can’t decide if I like Blood Money or Truths and Rights more, comment below with the one you like more.

Follow @Protoje and @MortimerMusic on all social media platforms.

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

A month ago Blvk H3ro released this song but if you haven’t heard it, it’s still new music. There have been a lot of releases over the past weeks, so it’s finally time to share this song. H3ro released On & On for the people, the track is not for sale. Like most of Blvk H3ro’s music the rhythm is upbeat urging one to rock or even dance to it. In the song he iterates that life goes on and on, and with each day comes new opportunities. So you’re not to let the disappointments you face be the end of your dreams. Take a listen to On & On by Blvk H3ro.

Follow @BlvkH3ro on Twitter and Instagram!

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

Can you believe school is getting to me already? It along with a bit of personal things have been taking up my time. I’m very sorry for this late post, I decided to post this song today and not hold it ’til next week because y’all need to hear this. Y’all need to know what Jeeby Lyricist has been up to. He released “Come For Me” not too long ago and I love it. His rapping on the hip hop styled instrumental is so smooth. Jeeby touches on topics that linger in the deep crevasses of the mind and soul, some of the thoughts you may find hard to share with others. This one is to your lover, to your best friend, to your soulmate. He thanks her for supporting him through his lowest moments as well as his highest. Praising her for being there as a motivator in his life, “Come for me” is all he’s asking, that when he’s down, she will be around; all while playing on the sexual innuendo. Bwoy…must be nice. Take a listen to “Come For Me” by Jeeby Lyricist featuring Courtni.

Follow! @JeebyLyricist and @singCourtniSing on Twitter and Instagram.

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

Today I have a new single from Jane Macgizmo. Her first single, Babylon, did it’s rounds and Too Late is putting up great competition. In the song she pleads for her partner’s love. Jane’s voice and the upbeat riddim of the song has got me hooked, breaking out my inner diva when I sing along. This week she released a lyric video for it, check it out below.

Follow @JaneMacgizmo on Instagram & Twitter!

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Expression Wednesdays

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I have something special today, I’m sharing the first song from the lovely Courtni. In this song she sings about her past relationship trauma which continues to cause problems for her prospective ‘Bae’. The upbeat riddim contrasts the painful story displayed by the lyrics. A nuh just now Courtni have an amazing voice, known from the Di Vibe (band); we’ve also got a taste of her voice as she’s been featured in a few songs. This song was produced by J Beatz, take a listen to Broke My Heart.

Follow!

@SingCourtniSing on Twitter & Instagram.

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Reggae Without Lyrics

“One good thing about music is when it hits you feel no pain”

 

Reggae is…. Indescribable. It is a musical language born from a people who had no voice, people who were the downtrodden of society and cast aside. In the history of Jamaica, you will find Reggae has a prominent part to play as both a symbol of unity and peace where its lyrics held sway over the ambitions of many a youth who sought the spotlight in the good ol’ Sound System days where the One Drop ruled supreme.

Fast forward to present day where Reggae’s younger sibling, Dancehall has been dominant for the last few years and where Reggae is seen as something for the more mature crowd who are not necessarily into the raunchy and outspoken nature of Dancehall, where it is more celebrated in Europe and Japan and you wonder about the allure that Reggae has on these predominantly white/Asian cultures. You see Reggae for us (Jamaicans, Caribbeans and African races) is built in, the drums are our heartbeat, the guitar resonates with the tingles in our skin. For persons not in black culture, it is almost a rare sensation, almost like watching an eclipse and then feeling the sun on your skin again after a cold morning. Its warmth spreads and there is this feeling of calm in your body. For us, it is natural.

Lately I have been listening to to Reggae instrumentals, a strange habit I know yet it has let me have a new appreciation for where the genre is today. In the past musicians were expensive and to keep costs down, you had to keep the beat to the minimum. You had your pianist, rhythm guitarists, the drummer who was the heartbeat of the riddim with the One Drop and then of course the bassist who is the soul with the rhythmic, resonating thumm thumm in the background . Then there was one additional sound to add, whether this was a horn or a harmonica or the mento box but something to “sweeten the beat.” This of course meant that your lyrics in a sense were front and center. Think of Dub Poetry as Reggae’s other cousin with the beat helping to tell your story but can also tell a story BY itself. Dancehall as a pop variant of Reggae is a slave to the whims of its younger audience, having to move to trends and fads remember the auto tune (computer voice) phase that almost every genre went through? Exactly.

 

Reggae’s deliberate and sometimes unconscious simplicity is what gives it that ability to transcend cultural borders and norms. It’s one of the reasons why long after his death Bob Marley’s Three Little Birds even without its lyrics feels like a song that one can wake up to, “Redemption Song’s” instrumental has a feeling of deep thought, sadness and hope, “Is This Love?”  has a joyous and questioning feel to it. Reggae’s roots in simplicity and the earnestness of its everyday practitioners in the ghetto who valued togetherness and had a certain honest nature to them is welcomed even more so that it is so rare these days. After all if you do Reggae these days, you do it for the love not the likes.

Contributed by Patrick Lawson from Patricklawson.online.