Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

I have brand new reggae music for you! Today I’m sharing “Lightning Storm” by 5 Star! The first thing that grabbed me was that bassline, the groove is so nice; the rhythm has an original rockas reggae feel to it. On this smooth riddim 5 Star raps animatedly, warning Babylon to be stable before they run into trouble or the lightning storm. His lyrics have a strong militancy, as he pushes to defend himself with protection from Haile Selassie I. Take a listen to Lightning Storm by 5 Star, produced by Kabaka Pyramid and Genius.

Tell me in the comments below what you think!

Follow 5Star:

twitter.com @5StarSOL
soundcloud.com/5starsol
instagram.com @5starsol

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

On this Expression Wednesday, we have new music from Jah9, last week she blessed us with “Feel Good”. A reggae track enlightening us on the importance of physical health. Jah9 urges us to surrender to the high vibration of the tings weh mek yuh body feel good, no matter where. This song really is the in-depth variation of “drink water and mind your own business”; she speaks of keeping hydrated and practicing exercise, whether yoga, dancing, or otherwise, all on a smooth reggae riddim. As a yoga practitioner and teacher, and a believer of the holistic and natural ways of healing; this is what she wants to bring to the world, and what better way than through her art form.

I must commend Nickii Kane for the accompanying visuals, they are immaculate, and that yellow, it really brings an air of positivity. Take a listen to “Feel Good”, let me know what you think in the comments below.

Follow @Jah9 Twitter and @Jah9Online on Instagram, keep abreast with her movements at Jah9.com.

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

This project has been out for a while but better late than never. Keznamdi released Skyline Levels vol 1 earlier this year, and I’ve brought it here for you to hear. It’s lovely, the vibe it gives off is when you wake up early on a Saturday morning, burst open your windows to see perfect weather, so you decide to start washing or cleaning. After deciding to clean, you’d put on this EP. The songs compliment each other, you need not skip any, just let it play out, enjoying all of them.

I can’t even pick a fave off the project, but if I was forced to, I think I’d pick “So Right”. Take a listen to Skyline Levels vol 1; comment below your favourite song.

Follow @Keznamdi on all social media platforms!

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

Come here please, take a look at the newest track to touch the street. 17-year old, Koffee, introduced herself to the world with a catchy reggae song. “Burning” was released the beginning of October. Don’t sleep on this song y’all, after listening to it twice I found myself humming it. She is out to give inspiration as she follows her dreams.

“Nothing can’t out my flame, no it can’t quench, can’t cool, can’t tame”

I love the message, and I love her voice. She encourages us to keep passionate, and keep our flame burning brightly. Koffee isn’t the usual, watch out for her, and take a listen to Burning.

Follow this little lady @OriginalKoffee on Instagram and Twitter.

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Lila Ike on Gotti Gotti

Fresh out the studio, Lila Ike’s second single, “Gotti Gotti” is available on all platforms; stream it on Soundcloud, YouTube or Spotify, buy it on iTunes or Amazon, what are you waiting on? Lila is basically telling off the greedy people roaming the earth. In Jamaica there’s a saying “Wanty wanty nuh get it and getty getty nuh want it” which translates to “those who want it aren’t getting it and those who got it don’t want it.” In this song, miss Lila is playing on the saying; instead she says “you got it but you ever (still) want want…” Leaving little for those who have none at all. Straight out of Jamaica under the In Digg Nation Collective, take a listen to Gotti Gotti by Lila Ike.

Follow @_LilaIke on Twitter and @LilaIke on Instagram. The track artwork is by @PaigeZombie on Instagram.

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Expression Wednesdays

Hi Everyone!

Today I have a new reggae song on the scene, “Punchinella” by Pentateuch Movement. I appreciate the authentic ‘rootsy’ sound of the riddim. In the song he’s telling Punchinella what he has to offer, some reasons she should accept his love. Though, Punchinella has her sights set on someone else. Take a listen to Punchinella, tell me what you think in the comments below!

Follow @PentateuchMove on Twitter and @PentateuchMovement on Instagram.

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Lily Of Da Valley

Serengetti, Hope Zoo

We had gathered for the launch of “Lily Of Da Valley” Jesse Royal’s debut album. The event was amazing; it was beautiful to see all the fans come out, despite the rainy weather we had a packed venue. The Serengetti space in Hope Zoo is home to the the Rib Kage restaurant. It was my first time at the newly formed restaurant. The venue was arranged to fit a large stage, as well as space for standing and a few seating options. The green surroundings gave a feeling of being in a forest, a people filled forest though. The venue was filled was warm energy as people milled about, waiting for the start of the show.

Jesse Royal, Lily of da valley, debut album, reggae, in Jamaica, Debbie Bisson, 87Lover, Universal Reggae, Serengetti,
Jesse Royal answers a question from host, Debbie Bissoon (Photo: Universal Reggae)

The night began with a short question and answer segment; where Debbie Bissoon asked Jesse Royal questions. To name a few, she asked what was his inspiration for the name of the album, what he stood for as a Rastafarian, and for a couple words to young artistes on how to get motivation to pursue this life. He said he got inspiration from his Grandma, when he was younger she would take him to church with her, and he enjoyed hearing the choir singing, “Lily of the Valley.”  As a Rastafarian Jesse Royal is fighting for love, family and strength. To give a few wise words to upcoming artistes, his advice is to “follow what’s inside you…” He went on to say there’s a voice inside of each and everyone, and once you reason with yourself and get to understand the being that is you.; you will figure out how to persist on your journey. Only you can figure it out.

Three of Jesse’s favourites off the album are 400 Years, Always Be Around, and Jah Will See Us Through. He explained that 400 Years is a reminder that the struggle nuh done,  Always Be Around is from the birth of his first child, it’s telling his daughter, he will always be around. And Jah Will See Us Through is a special song to him, it gave hopefulness in certain situations during this year, this song iterated that, “There’s a God that run bout yah and no weapon formed against you shall prosper.” To close the Q&A segment they played songs off the album for us.

Jesse Royal, Lily of da valley, debut album, reggae, in Jamaica, 87Lover, Universal Reggae, Serengetti,
Jesse Royal (Photo: Universal Reggae)

After a short break Jesse took the stage with his full band, firstly giving us 400 Years. He almost went through the entire album. Anyone that’s a fan can attest to his soulfulness while performing. He gained the attention of everyone in the crowd as he sang, we could feel the energy and intent of his songs as he performed. He sang Life Sweet, Stand Firm, Roll Me Something Good, Real Love, Rock It Tonight, Generation, Jah Will See Us Through, Modern Day Judas, and Always Be Around. He ended the lovely night with a meet and greet with the fans.

“Lily Of Da Valley” by Jesse Royal is now available worldwide, purchase the album at JesseRoyalMusic.

Follow @JesseRoyal1 on all social media platforms.

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Reggae Without Lyrics

“One good thing about music is when it hits you feel no pain”

 

Reggae is…. Indescribable. It is a musical language born from a people who had no voice, people who were the downtrodden of society and cast aside. In the history of Jamaica, you will find Reggae has a prominent part to play as both a symbol of unity and peace where its lyrics held sway over the ambitions of many a youth who sought the spotlight in the good ol’ Sound System days where the One Drop ruled supreme.

Fast forward to present day where Reggae’s younger sibling, Dancehall has been dominant for the last few years and where Reggae is seen as something for the more mature crowd who are not necessarily into the raunchy and outspoken nature of Dancehall, where it is more celebrated in Europe and Japan and you wonder about the allure that Reggae has on these predominantly white/Asian cultures. You see Reggae for us (Jamaicans, Caribbeans and African races) is built in, the drums are our heartbeat, the guitar resonates with the tingles in our skin. For persons not in black culture, it is almost a rare sensation, almost like watching an eclipse and then feeling the sun on your skin again after a cold morning. Its warmth spreads and there is this feeling of calm in your body. For us, it is natural.

Lately I have been listening to to Reggae instrumentals, a strange habit I know yet it has let me have a new appreciation for where the genre is today. In the past musicians were expensive and to keep costs down, you had to keep the beat to the minimum. You had your pianist, rhythm guitarists, the drummer who was the heartbeat of the riddim with the One Drop and then of course the bassist who is the soul with the rhythmic, resonating thumm thumm in the background . Then there was one additional sound to add, whether this was a horn or a harmonica or the mento box but something to “sweeten the beat.” This of course meant that your lyrics in a sense were front and center. Think of Dub Poetry as Reggae’s other cousin with the beat helping to tell your story but can also tell a story BY itself. Dancehall as a pop variant of Reggae is a slave to the whims of its younger audience, having to move to trends and fads remember the auto tune (computer voice) phase that almost every genre went through? Exactly.

 

Reggae’s deliberate and sometimes unconscious simplicity is what gives it that ability to transcend cultural borders and norms. It’s one of the reasons why long after his death Bob Marley’s Three Little Birds even without its lyrics feels like a song that one can wake up to, “Redemption Song’s” instrumental has a feeling of deep thought, sadness and hope, “Is This Love?”  has a joyous and questioning feel to it. Reggae’s roots in simplicity and the earnestness of its everyday practitioners in the ghetto who valued togetherness and had a certain honest nature to them is welcomed even more so that it is so rare these days. After all if you do Reggae these days, you do it for the love not the likes.

Contributed by Patrick Lawson from Patricklawson.online.

Upcoming Events! 

Hey guys, summer is coming to a close, so let’s make the best of it. The events are still up and running, here is a short list of things happening this week. Comment below if you’re interested in checking out one of these events!

Continue reading “Upcoming Events! “

Expression Wednesdays

Hello Loves!

It’s Wednesday so I got some brand new tings to share with you. Ras-I released an ode to the beautiful black woman, titled “Nubian.” This song touches your soul from the instrumental intro, as he strongly says, “It’s hard to find the perfect words, to tell you how I feel…” Same! That was my exact sentiment in regards to this instrumental. I must admit as a black woman, this song truly made me feel special, appreciated even. Ras-I boasted a number of amazing traits of his black woman. Though this is about the lovely women out there, this song is one to rock along to with someone special, take a listen to Nubian.

The cover art seen above was created by Paige.

Follow!

Twitter:
@RasI_Musique
@PaigeZxmbie

Instgram:
@Ras_I_Musique
@PaigeZombie

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